Thursday, June 24, 2010

An Inconvenient Truth: Manho Al Gore is a Crazed Sex Poodle



Al Gore A "Crazed Sex Poodle?"

The Smoking Gun

JUNE 24, 2010 -- Masseuse's claims read like R-rated vice presidential fan fiction.

In a bizarre statement to police, the Oregon woman who claims that Al Gore fondled and groped her during a massage session described the former Vice President as a giggling "crazed sex poodle" who gave a "come hither" look before pouncing on her in a Portland hotel suite. In a taped January 2009 interview with cops, the 54-year-old woman, a licensed masseuse whose name has been redacted from police records, read from a lengthy prepared statement that detailed her alleged October 2006 encounter with Gore at the Hotel Lucia. Excerpts from the Portland Police Bureau transcript of the 2009 interview can be found on the following pages. In December 2006, a lawyer for the woman told police about the purported encounter, but after the masseuse cancelled three interview appointments, the case was closed due to her refusal to "cooperate with the investigation or even report a crime." It is unclear why, two years later, she approached Portland police and sought to memorialize her allegations against Gore, who she portrayed as a tipsy, handsy predator who forced her to drink Grand Marnier, pinned her to a bed, and forcibly French kissed her. The woman's statement--which could be mistaken for R-rated Vice Presidential fan fiction--describes Gore as a man with a "violent temper as well as extremely dictatorial commanding attitude besides his Mr. Smiley Global Warming concern persona." After fleeing Gore's suite, the woman returned home to discover, a la Lewinsky, "stains on the front of my black slacks." Suspecting that the stains were Gore bodily fluids, the woman made sure not to clean them. "I carefully hung them up and decided to be sure not to launder them until I knew more what to do with what had happened. Just my intuition." While the masseuse hired a civil attorney, "I was not interested in making any money from this case," she told cops. "I did not want to be labeled a gold digger like the women in this situation are often labeled." The woman recently eased off this principled stand when she offered to sell her story to the National Enquirer for $1 million. (15 pages)

CLICK HERE to download a PDF of the Portland Police Bureau's file on the Gore allegation (it includes the 67-page transcript of the woman's January 2009 interview with cops).






PORTLAND DA: CRIMINAL PROSECUTION POSSIBLE IN THE AL GORE SEX SCANDAL

LATEST: In a bombshell new development in the AL GORE sex scandal -- broken EXCLUSIVELY earlier today by The ENQUIRER -- the Oregon District Attorney says there's "the possibility of a criminal prosecution."

In a statement just released by Multnomah County (OR.) D.A. Michael D. Schrunk, the official reveals that "our office was notified by the Portland Police Bureau that further investigation of this matter had been conducted by it in 2009 and we were provided with the reports from that further investigation."

Schrunk goes on to add: "If the complainant and the Portland Police Bureau wish to pursue the possibility of a criminal prosecution, additional investigation by the Bureau will be necessary and will be discussed with the Portland Police Bureau."

The D.A. says the police first briefed his office in late 2006 and early 2007 on the allegations but was told "the woman was not willing to be interviewed by the Portland Police Bureau and did not want a criminal investigation to proceed."



updated 6:51 PM EDT 6/23/10

ENQUIRER WORLD EXCLUSIVE: AL GORE has been accused of sexually attacking a masseuse in Portland, Oregon - and is named in the official police report about the alleged assault, The ENQUIRER has learned exclusively!

The bombshell story will appear in the new issue of The ENQUIRER and will include the secret police documents, a photo of the woman making the stunning charges and will reveal the shocking details about the pants she saved as evidence!

Our investigative team uncovered the amazing story just weeks after the former Vice President announced that he and wife TIPPER were ending their 40-year marriage - amidst reports she suspected her husband was involved with "a gorgeous massage therapist."

We have verified the 62-year-old former VP was in Portland at the time of the alleged incident - Oct. 24, 2006 - and we saw the $540 massage bill.

No criminal charges were brought against Gore, but the Portland police prepared a document marked "Confidential Special Report" - which records the explosive allegations of "unwanted sexual contact" by Al Gore "at a local upscale hotel."

The ENQUIRER is withholding the name of the 54-year-old woman making the stunning accusations because she is potentially a sex-crime victim.

Pick up the new issue of The ENQUIRER for all details of this world exclusive story!

The National Enquirer was founded by CIA agent Alexander Pope, for it's propaganda value in supermarket checkout lanes, targeted at non-buyers.




Portland woman says Al Gore groped her in hotel room

The Oregonian
June 23, 2010

A Portland massage therapist gave local police a detailed statement last year alleging that former Vice President Al Gore groped her, kissed her and made unwanted sexual advances during a late-night massage session in October 2006 in a suite at the upscale Hotel Lucia.

The woman told investigators that she informed two friends and kept the clothes she wore that night, including her black pants with stains on them. But Portland police didn't contact any of the woman's friends, obtain the potential evidence or interview anyone at the hotel, records show.

"The case was not investigated any further because detectives concluded there was insufficient evidence to support the allegations," the Portland Police Bureau said in a prepared statement Wednesday, responding to inquiries from all over the world after the National Enquirer broke the story on its website.

In her detailed Jan. 8, 2009, statement to a Portland sexual assault investigator, the woman said she was called to the hotel about 10:30 p.m. Oct. 24, 2006, to provide a massage for Gore, who was registered under the name "Mr. Stone." Once inside his ninth-floor suite, she said he pushed her hand to his groin, fondled her buttocks and breasts, tongue-kissed her and threw her down on the bed as she tried to thwart his advances.

She also said Gore had finished a beer and opened a bottle of Grand Marnier while she was in the room.

While the Police Bureau considers it a closed case, it said it would reopen it if new evidence is received.

Portland police spokeswoman Detective Mary Wheat said police didn't go to the hotel or talk to the woman's friends because it wouldn't help prove or disprove the woman's allegations.

"We're not disputing Al Gore was in the hotel room with this woman," Wheat said. "The two people in that room were Mr. Gore and this woman. If a bellhop came in and saw something, that would be different."

The Multnomah County district attorney's office was aware that the woman's attorney filed a complaint with police about two months after the encounter, but the woman didn't show up for three scheduled interviews with police investigators. At that time, police were told the woman didn't want to proceed with a criminal case and would pursue a civil case instead.

Multnomah County District Attorney Michael Schrunk said Wednesday that his office was not informed that Portland police had taken another statement from the massage therapist in 2009 and only received those reports once the National Enquirer story broke.

"If the complainant and the Portland Police Bureau wish to pursue the possibility of a criminal prosecution, additional investigation by the Bureau will be necessary and will be discussed with the Portland Police Bureau," Schrunk said in a prepared release.

Gore family spokeswoman Kalee Kreider said the former vice president has no comment. Gore and his wife, Tipper, announced June 1 they were separating.

The 54-year-old massage therapist, who lives in Southeast Portland, refused to talk to a reporter from The Oregonian when approached Wednesday afternoon. She emerged from her home about 4:30 p.m. wearing a large floppy hat and sunglasses and was accompanied by a young man, who was carrying a bag. The two drove away in a car with Washington license plates.

According to a lengthy transcript of the woman's Jan. 8, 2009, statement to a Portland detective, the therapist said she arrived in the suite about 11 p.m. Earlier that evening, Gore addressed a near-capacity crowd in the Rose Garden's Theater of the Clouds, telling the audience that man-made global climate change is the most important moral challenge of our time. She said Gore changed into a bathrobe, spoke of his grueling travel schedule and need to relax and told her to call him "Al."

While giving Gore an abdominal massage, she said he demanded that she go lower and soon grabbed her right hand and shoved it under the sheet.

"I felt like I was dancing on the edge of a razor," she told Detective Molly Daul.

She tried to use an acupressure technique to relax Gore and thought she may have nearly put him to sleep. She went into the bathroom to wash up and came out to pack up.

That's when, she says, Gore wrapped her in an "inescapable embrace" and fondled her back, buttocks and breasts as she was trying to break down her massage table.

She called him a "crazed sex poodle" and tried to distract him, pointing out a box of Moonstruck chocolates on a nearby table. He went for the chocolates and then offered her some, cornering her, fondling her and shoving his tongue in her mouth to french kiss as he pressed against her.

She said he tried to pull her camisole strap down.

She said she told him to stop it. "I was distressed, shocked and terrified."

She said she was intimidated by his physical size, calling him "rotund," described his "violent temper, dictatorial, commanding attitude" -- what she termed a contrast from his "Mr. Smiley global-warming concern persona."

Later, she said, he tried to lure her into the bedroom to hear pop star Pink's "Dear Mr. President" on his iPod dock. She said Gore sat on one end of the bed and motioned for her to join him.

Suddenly, she said, he "flipped me on my back, threw his whole body face down over a top me, pinning me down."

She said she loudly protested, "Get off me, you big lummox!"

The therapist said she injured her left leg and knee and sought medical care for several months.

The therapist later told detectives she did not call the police because she was afraid she wouldn't be believed. "I deeply feared being made into a public spectacle and my work reputation being destroyed," she said.

As it was, she said, even friends of hers who had voted for Gore didn't necessarily support her. She did call the Portland Women's Crisis Line, which encouraged her to call police.

She told detectives last year that she was not out for money but only wants "justice."

"He should not get a free pass merely because of his position. People in power are not to be given a license to behave in ways that the rest of us are not."

Randall Vogt, a Pearl District attorney who specializes in sexual misconduct cases, said he represented the massage therapist in 2006. "That file was closed and put to bed and forgotten," Vogt said. "She and I parted on friendly terms as best I can recall." He was not aware that his former client reactivated her claims against Gore last year.

Wheat said police didn't investigate the woman's 2009 statement further because "they didn't feel there was any additional evidence that would change what they saw in 2006." That's also why the police didn't consult with the district attorney's office about the 2009 statement, she said. Wheat added that the woman received a lot of attention from police and a victim's advocate, who made sure she had counseling.

In 2007 or 2008, then-Portland Tribune reporter Nick Budnick made a public records request and obtained the Portland police report, but the newspaper did not run a story.

Mark Garber, the Tribune's editor-in-chief, said the woman was not willing to talk on the record or press charges and the paper considered the time lapse between the incident and when the paper received the police report. "In the end, we decided not to proceed with a story that we could not document," Garber said.

The statute of limitations for third-degree sex abuse, which is the classification Portland police gave to the complaint in 2006 and 2007, is four years after the commission of the crime. However, if the accused is not an inhabitant or usually a resident in the state, then the statute of limitations is extended for a maximum of three years. So, in this case, the statute of limitations would not run out until 2013. No civil suit had been filed.

-- Maxine Bernstein

Helen Jung, Kimberly Wilson and Lynne Terry contributed to this report.

Original police report (heavily redacted)






Exclusive: Al Gore Cheats with Larry David's Ex

The Star


Al Gore's split from wife Tipper after 40 years of marriage was a shock to everyone who thought theirs was the ideal marriage. Now Star can exclusively reveal that the former Vice President was having an affair with Larry David's ex-wife — for the past two years!

In the June 28 issue of Star, on sale Wednesday, we report that Al and Tipper's breakup didn't come as much of a surprise to one Hollywood player — Laurie David. Star has learned that Al has been having an affair with Laurie, who divorced Seinfeld creator and Curb Your Enthusiasm star Larry David in 2007 amidst reports she was cheating with the caretaker of their Martha's Vineyard summer home.



“Al and Laurie went from friends to lovers," an insider tells Star. "It couldn’t be avoided."

Pick up the new issue of Star tomorrow for our complete story of how the pair, who have been fighting for the environment for years and worked together on Al's 2006 Oscar-winning documentary An Inconvenient Truth, fell hard for one another — and if Tipper had any clue.




Wiki: Mrs Larry David, Sex Poodle Lover

Born as Laurie Ellen Lennard, Laurie was married to Larry David (co-creator of Seinfeld and creator of Curb Your Enthusiasm) for 14 years. The couple announced their intention to amicably separate on June 5, 2007. Laurie David filed for divorce on July 19, 2007.[2][3]

Global warming

Laurie David is best known for her efforts to stop global warming. She founded the Stop Global Warming Virtual March[4] with Senator John McCain and Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. Ms. magazine quoted David about the grassroots aspect of her campaign: "If everyone does one thing, they are likely to do two things, then three things. Then they are likely to influence friends and family, and that's how you build a movement."

In addition to the Virtual March, Laurie David has produced several other projects to bring the issue of global warming into mainstream popular culture, including the release of her first book, Stop Global Warming: The Solution Is You!, and the comedy special, Earth to America! for TBS, which aired November 20, 2005, featuring Tom Hanks, Will Ferrell, Steve Martin, and Jack Black, among others.

The show garnered positive reviews and sparked hundreds of TV, print and radio stories about global warming. In addition to the Academy Award-winning documentary An Inconvenient Truth, starring Al Gore, she produced the HBO documentary Too Hot Not to Handle on the effects of global warming in the United States, which aired on HBO on April 22, 2006. Laurie David also appeared in Big Ideas for a Small Planet, an environmentalist documentary series on the Sundance Channel.

Large carbon footprint

In an interview with The Guardian in November 2006, David acknowledged that owning two homes on opposite sides of the country and flying in a private jet several times per year is at odds with her message to others. In the interview she notes "Yes, I take a private plane on holiday a couple of times a year, and I feel horribly guilty about it. I probably shouldn't do it. But the truth is, I'm not perfect. This is not about perfection. I don't expect anybody else to be perfect either. That's what hurts the environmental movement – holding people to a standard they cannot meet. That just pushes people away."[5]

Paving over protected wetlands

In 2005, and then again in 2009, David was cited by the Chilmark Conservation Commission for paving over protected wetland areas on her estate at Martha's Vineyard.




Al & Tipper Gore Separate!

The Star
June 1, 2010

Al Gore and his wife Tipper Gore have split after 40 years of marriage.

The Gores said it was "a mutual and mutually supportive decision that we have made together following a process of long and careful consideration," according to an e-mailed statement obtained by The Associated Press Tuesday.

Since his time in office, the former Vice President has focused his attention on the dangers of global warming and running the Current TV cable television network.

The couple have four grown children, Karenna, Kristin, Sarah and twice-convicted jailbird Albert III.








ManBearPigs say Global Warming skeptics have 'dumber kids, uglier wives, smaller pricks'


Mail your Global Warming Carbon Fart Tax to billionaire Al Gore, to pay for the air your breathe

Tuesday, June 22, 2010

Police state death squad arrests husband for driving wife to hospital with stroke



Newlywed couple: Officer blocked us from ER during bride's stroke

Video: 'Cop blocked us from entering ER,' Jesse Wright released from jail

CHATTANOOGA, TENN. – A patient, believed to be having a stroke, says an officer with the Chattanooga Police Department blocked her husband from taking her to the emergency room at Erlanger Wednesday night.

Aline Wright is a cancer survivor, amputee and a newlywed. Wednesday night she began to show signs she was having a stroke.

"I started feeling some left arm numbness and a facial droop," said Aline.

"It appeared to me that I was probably having a stroke."

That's when her husband of four days, Jesse Wright, put her in the car and rushed her to the Erlanger Medical Center. Wright knows an emergency. He is a nurse technician at Erlanger.

On the way to the hospital, Aline says Jesse treated two red lights like stop signs. He would stop and then proceed if no traffic was coming. After Jesse ran the second stop light one block from Erlanger, the officer turned on the cruiser's blue lights and followed the couple into the emergency room parking lot.

"At that point we figured because we were so close to Erlanger emergency department that the police would be aware that's where we were going," said Aline.

According to Aline, the officer caught up with the couple as they were attempting to enter the emergency room at Erlanger Medical Center. Aline says her husband was carrying her in his arms because she could not walk. According to Aline, the officer blocked the entrance and demanded answers for running the red lights.

"He picks me up in his arms and the officer continues to block the way into the emergency room," said Aline.

"He's standing between Jesse and I, and the emergency room doors."




"Necessity" is always a valid legal defense. Even for justifiable homicide of copsters. Ask the Houston Bros, or veterans of the Battle of Athens TN.

KTP

U.S. Govt poisoned its own citizens during Prohibition, 10000 murdered


Ethanol poisoning causes brain damage

In a dark but little-known chapter of U.S. history, the federal government ordered the poisoning of alcohol supplies to deter and punish those who sought to flout Prohibition-era bans.

Starting in 1906, the United States began requiring manufacturers of industrial ethanol to put the chemical through a process to distinguish it from the identical substance found in alcoholic beverages. After the manufacture, sale and transportation of alcohol was banned by the 18th Amendment and the government cracked down on smuggling operations, bootleggers turned to chemistry to keep their customers supplied. A simple process was used to extract toxic chemicals from the industrial alcohol used in paints, solvents, fuels and medicine, and this relatively clean alcohol was then used to make beverages. By the mid-1920s, an estimated 60 million gallons of industrial alcohol were being stolen per year.

In response, the administration of President Calvin Coolidge ordered industry to add higher levels of more difficult-to-remove poisons to their alcohol, including acetone, benzene, cadmium, camphor, carbolic acid, chloroform, ether, formaldehyde, gasoline, iodine, kerosene, methyl alcohol, mercury salts, nicotine, quinine and zinc. Shortly after the institution of this campaign, 31 people were poisoned to death over the course of the Christmas holiday in New York City alone. Historians estimate that a total of 10,000 people were killed by the program before Prohibition ended in 1933.

The poisoning program was no secret, as the government hoped that knowledge of it would deter people from drinking -- although consumption of alcohol was not itself illegal.

"The government knows it is not stopping drinking by putting poison in alcohol," said New York City medical examiner Charles Norris. "[Y]et it continues its poisoning processes, heedless of the fact that people determined to drink are daily absorbing that poison. Knowing this to be true, the United States government must be charged with the moral responsibility for the deaths that poisoned liquor causes."

It was Christmas Eve 1926, the streets aglitter with snow and lights, when the man afraid of Santa Claus stumbled into the emergency room at New York City's Bellevue Hospital. He was flushed, gasping with fear: Santa Claus, he kept telling the nurses, was just behind him, wielding a baseball bat.
Before hospital staff realized how sick he was—the alcohol-induced hallucination was just a symptom—the man died. So did another holiday partygoer.

And another. As dusk fell on Christmas, the hospital staff tallied up more than 60 people made desperately ill by alcohol and eight dead from it. Within the next two days, yet another 23 people died in the city from celebrating the season.

Doctors were accustomed to alcohol poisoning by then, the routine of life in the Prohibition era. The bootlegged whiskies and so-called gins often made people sick. The liquor produced in hidden stills frequently came tainted with metals and other impurities. But this outbreak was bizarrely different. The deaths, as investigators would shortly realize, came courtesy of the U.S. government.

Frustrated that people continued to consume so much alcohol even after it was banned, federal officials had decided to try a different kind of enforcement. They ordered the poisoning of industrial alcohols manufactured in the United States, products regularly stolen by bootleggers and resold as drinkable spirits. The idea was to scare people into giving up illicit drinking. Instead, by the time Prohibition ended in 1933, the federal poisoning program, by some estimates, had killed at least 10,000 people.

Although mostly forgotten today, the "chemist's war of Prohibition" remains one of the strangest and most deadly decisions in American law-enforcement history. As one of its most outspoken opponents, Charles Norris, the chief medical examiner of New York City during the 1920s, liked to say, it was "our national experiment in extermination." Poisonous alcohol still kills—16 people died just this month after drinking lethal booze in Indonesia, where bootleggers make their own brews to avoid steep taxes—but that's due to unscrupulous businessmen rather than government order.

I learned of the federal poisoning program while researching my new book, The Poisoner's Handbook, which is set in jazz-age New York. My first reaction was that I must have gotten it wrong. "I never heard that the government poisoned people during Prohibition, did you?" I kept saying to friends, family members, colleagues.

I did, however, remember the U.S. government's controversial decision in the 1970s to spray Mexican marijuana fields with Paraquat, an herbicide. Its use was primarily intended to destroy crops, but government officials also insisted that awareness of the toxin would deter marijuana smokers. They echoed the official position of the 1920s—if some citizens ended up poisoned, well, they'd brought it upon themselves. Although Paraquat wasn't really all that toxic, the outcry forced the government to drop the plan. Still, the incident created an unsurprising lack of trust in government motives, which reveals itself in the occasional rumors circulating today that federal agencies, such as the CIA, mix poison into the illegal drug supply.

During Prohibition, however, an official sense of higher purpose kept the poisoning program in place. As the Chicago Tribune editorialized in 1927: "Normally, no American government would engage in such business. … It is only in the curious fanaticism of Prohibition that any means, however barbarous, are considered justified." Others, however, accused lawmakers opposed to the poisoning plan of being in cahoots with criminals and argued that bootleggers and their law-breaking alcoholic customers deserved no sympathy. "Must Uncle Sam guarantee safety first for souses?" asked Nebraska's Omaha Bee.

The saga began with ratification of the 18th Amendment, which banned the manufacture, sale, or transportation of alcoholic beverages in the United States.* High-minded crusaders and anti-alcohol organizations had helped push the amendment through in 1919, playing on fears of moral decay in a country just emerging from war. The Volstead Act, spelling out the rules for enforcement, passed shortly later, and Prohibition itself went into effect on Jan. 1, 1920.

But people continued to drink—and in large quantities. Alcoholism rates soared during the 1920s; insurance companies charted the increase at more than 300 more percent. Speakeasies promptly opened for business. By the decade's end, some 30,000 existed in New York City alone. Street gangs grew into bootlegging empires built on smuggling, stealing, and manufacturing illegal alcohol. The country's defiant response to the new laws shocked those who sincerely (and naively) believed that the amendment would usher in a new era of upright behavior.

Rigorous enforcement had managed to slow the smuggling of alcohol from Canada and other countries. But crime syndicates responded by stealing massive quantities of industrial alcohol—used in paints and solvents, fuels and medical supplies—and redistilling it to make it potable.
Well, sort of. Industrial alcohol is basically grain alcohol with some unpleasant chemicals mixed in to render it undrinkable. The U.S. government started requiring this "denaturing" process in 1906 for manufacturers who wanted to avoid the taxes levied on potable spirits. The U.S. Treasury Department, charged with overseeing alcohol enforcement, estimated that by the mid-1920s, some 60 million gallons of industrial alcohol were stolen annually to supply the country's drinkers. In response, in 1926, President Calvin Coolidge's government decided to turn to chemistry as an enforcement tool. Some 70 denaturing formulas existed by the 1920s. Most simply added poisonous methyl alcohol into the mix. Others used bitter-tasting compounds that were less lethal, designed to make the alcohol taste so awful that it became undrinkable.

To sell the stolen industrial alcohol, the liquor syndicates employed chemists to "renature" the products, returning them to a drinkable state. The bootleggers paid their chemists a lot more than the government did, and they excelled at their job. Stolen and redistilled alcohol became the primary source of liquor in the country. So federal officials ordered manufacturers to make their products far more deadly.

By mid-1927, the new denaturing formulas included some notable poisons—kerosene and brucine (a plant alkaloid closely related to strychnine), gasoline, benzene, cadmium, iodine, zinc, mercury salts, nicotine, ether, formaldehyde, chloroform, camphor, carbolic acid, quinine, and acetone. The Treasury Department also demanded more methyl alcohol be added—up to 10 percent of total product. It was the last that proved most deadly.

The results were immediate, starting with that horrific holiday body count in the closing days of 1926. Public health officials responded with shock. "The government knows it is not stopping drinking by putting poison in alcohol," New York City medical examiner Charles Norris said at a hastily organized press conference. "[Y]et it continues its poisoning processes, heedless of the fact that people determined to drink are daily absorbing that poison. Knowing this to be true, the United States government must be charged with the moral responsibility for the deaths that poisoned liquor causes, although it cannot be held legally responsible."

His department issued warnings to citizens, detailing the dangers in whiskey circulating in the city: "[P]ractically all the liquor that is sold in New York today is toxic," read one 1928 alert. He publicized every death by alcohol poisoning. He assigned his toxicologist, Alexander Gettler, to analyze confiscated whiskey for poisons—that long list of toxic materials I cited came in part from studies done by the New York City medical examiner's office.

Norris also condemned the federal program for its disproportionate effect on the country's poorest residents. Wealthy people, he pointed out, could afford the best whiskey available. Most of those sickened and dying were those "who cannot afford expensive protection and deal in low grade stuff."

And the numbers were not trivial. In 1926, in New York City, 1,200 were sickened by poisonous alcohol; 400 died. The following year, deaths climbed to 700. These numbers were repeated in cities around the country as public-health officials nationwide joined in the angry clamor. Furious anti-Prohibition legislators pushed for a halt in the use of lethal chemistry. "Only one possessing the instincts of a wild beast would desire to kill or make blind the man who takes a drink of liquor, even if he purchased it from one violating the Prohibition statutes," proclaimed Sen. James Reed of Missouri.

Officially, the special denaturing program ended only once the 18th Amendment was repealed in December 1933. But the chemist's war itself faded away before then. Slowly, government officials quit talking about it. And when Prohibition ended and good grain whiskey reappeared, it was almost as if the craziness of Prohibition—and the poisonous measures taken to enforce it—had never quite happened.

Natural News: U.S. govt. poisoned its own citizens during Prohibition

SLATE: The Chemist's War - The little-told story of how the U.S. government poisoned alcohol during Prohibition with deadly consequences

"Strictly speaking, a driver can register a BAC of 0.00% and still be convicted of a DUI. The level of BAC does not clear a driver when it is below the 'presumed level of intoxication.'"
Tennessee Driver Handbook and Driver License Study Guide, 2010





"In 2007, 7,447 cases of isopropanol ingestions were reported to the US Poison Control Centers. Of these, 36 patients were classified as experiencing "major" morbidity with one patient dying. In the same year, 2,252 cases of methanol and 5,395 cases of ethylene glycol were reported. Of those intoxicated with methanol, 26 patients were classified as experiencing "major" disability, and 11 additional patients died. For those patients who were intoxicated with ethylene glycol, 135 patients were classified as having "major" disability, with an additional 16 patients dying.5 It is important to recognize that these numbers likely underestimate the true incidence of exposure, however, because of both a failure to recognize the ingestion as well as a failure to report the suspected or known ingestion to a poison control center."
http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/812411-overview

"In the United States, rubbing alcohol, USP and all preparations coming under the classification of Rubbing Alcohols must be manufactured in accordance with the requirements of the US Treasury Department, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms, using Formula 23-H (8 parts by volume of acetone, 1.5 parts by volume of methyl isobutyl ketone, and 100 parts by volume of ethyl alcohol). It contains 97.5-100% by volume of absolute ethyl alcohol, the rest consists of water and the denaturants, with or without color additives, and perfume oils. Rubbing Alcohol contains in each 100 mL not less than 355 mg of sucrose octaacetate or not less than 1.40 mg of denatonium benzoate. roduct labels for rubbing alcohol include a number of warnings about the chemical, including the flammability hazards and its intended use only as a topical antiseptic and not for internal wounds or consumption. It should be used in a well-ventilated area due to inhalation hazards. Poisoning can occur from ingestion, inhalation, or consumption of rubbing alcohol."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubbing_alcohol

"Ask A Scientist: What is the difference between denatured alcohol and rubbing alcohol? Denatured alcohol is ethanol to which poisonous and foul-tasting chamicals have been added to make it unfit for drinking. There is more than one recipe for denaturing alcohol; some add methanol or isopropanol, some gasoline, and so on. Rubbing alcohol is an alcohol intended to be rubbed on the skin. Frequently 70% iso-propyl alcohol / 30% water is used; sometimes ethanol with added iso-propyl alcohol is used. You don't want to use denatured alcohol that is made with anything that shouldn't be placed on the skin, such as gasoline! So, some, but not all, kinds of denatured alcohol can be used as rubbing alcohol. Rubbing alcohol may also not contain any ethanol at all, which would disqualify it from being "denatured". So, some but not all kinds of rubbing alcohol are denatured alcohol, and some but not all kinds of denatured alcohol can be rubbing alcohol."
-Richard E. Barrans Jr., Ph.D.
http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/chem00/chem00102.htm

KTP

Saturday, June 12, 2010

King of the South 2010



Motorcycle stunts, crashes, blood and babes in East Tennessee.

Watch Pirate News TV for the latest broadcast of KOTS 2010. PNTV sponsored rider David Boyd, then he got his nutsac got torn off. It's all good homie.



Boyd advises competitors to bring extra tires to KOTS, due to asphalt conditions. A single practice run can fry a tire from drifting.

Dirty George's Indy Freestyle comp run:



David "Superdave" Dalmasso's coaster rev-limit wheelie, dedicated to Satan:



Stay tuned to Pirate News for video of Superdave's surgery by rusty razor blade. BYO spray bottle of hydrogen peroxide.

David Boyd rips his nutsac:



ExtremeKings.com
myspace.com/KingMurdoc
ThrottleNation.com
411MotorSpeedway.net
StuntLife.com
StuntRide.com
DealsGapDragon.com

2009 KOTS







2008 KOTS


Download video

Not-for-profit news broadcast by Pirate News TV in Knoxville TN. Fair use for cross-promotional marketing to bypass media censors.





Stay tuned for updates on how Big Brother's Police State tried to kill King of the South in 2010, where motorcycle businesses report a 95% drop in revenues due to martial law.

Bonnaroo concert and Police State massive drug bust was on the same weekend, a tough act to compete with, for those who enjoy paying cops $100,000 for hotel accomodations. Even Bonnaroo had 25,000 less than last year, perhaps due to ticket prices between $250 and $1,200. Only one dead spactator.

Attendance that same weekend at the Yamaha R1/R6 Convention at Deals Gap was down 70% in 2010.

Also in June 2010, 2 Wheel Tuner magazine goes out of business, AMA Dragbike Series went kaput and ceased operations effective immediately, due to the economic Depression. No bank loans for bikes, or anything else. Brandi Neithamer, Vice President of AMA Dragbike, said, "We knew this year would be very difficult given the economic conditions, but we never anticipated it would go downhill so quickly." Frakkin bankstas at the private "Federal" Reserve Bank Corporation!



Shell-Shocked Americans Still Aren’t Buying Anything

incent Fernando, CFA
Business Insider
July 1, 2010

Despite a small rebound from crisis-lows, this long-term chart from Deutsche Bank keeps the rebound in perspective.

Americans’ discretionary spending remains at the lowest level in at least 60 years, as a percentage of GDP. This is despite strong sales of iPads and iPhone 4’s, which makes Apple’s (AAPL) continued success with new product launches even more commendable.

Note that we’d need about 5x the recent rebound to return discretionary spending back to previously normal levels.

Yet in a twist, Deutsche believes that since discretionary spending remains depressed, there’s less room for a large negative economic surprise on this front going forward.

Deutsche Bank’s Peter Hooper:

Finally, the U.S. economy today bears little resemblance to its pre-crisis state. Discretionary spending on durables and structures by households and firms (which drives recessions) has already been compressed to historic lows (Chart 15), and substantial progress has been made in mending balance sheets. Thus, there is much less “scope” for a sudden downturn than there was three years ago.

The economy suffered as discretionary spending dropped during the crisis. Yet the U.S. economy is now less dependent on this spending, since it remains far smaller as a proportion of GDP than before. Basically, people aren’t buying anything discretionary, so there’s little potential downside from this part of the economy.

Mr. Hooper points this out as part of a broader analysis about where the economy could be at risk, the chart above isn’t ‘good news’, it’s just tapped out as a source of further major negative surprises. The economy is now driven in different ways than before, less by big-ticket consumer spending and of course less by the housing industry.

Wednesday, June 9, 2010

Judge Bill Swann goes on trial 26 July 2010



KNOXVILLE, TENN. -- Click for full details from the $1-million libel and civil rights trial in Knox County Circuit Court, docket C:06-346406, Rose v Swann.

If you ever wanted to know how to sue a judge, now's your chance.